Monday, August 11, 2014

Melody's Garden still inspiring one year later....

Last August I introduced you to the beautiful garden of my friend Melody.  There have been some changes over the past year so I just have to show you how good it looks now.  Some of these views are similar to ones I shared last year, as with the coral vine which looks amazing on the barn.



Matching caladiums on the nearby sill.


I especially wanted to see the Crocosmia in bloom


Bright orange contrasts with the green foliage.




Crocosmia are grown from a bulb that looks like gladiolus.  I planted Crocosmia a few years ago and they didn't bloom so I replaced them.  Turns out I should have waited because Crocosmia take a few years to get established.  These look so good, I'll try again.



A peek through the fence to preview the new garden behind the barn which we'll tour on this visit.



First, a stroll through the shade garden


Same photo, yet different plant from last year.  The fern looks great planted this way.  Here's the link to my previous post.


A weeping redbud in the planter.


The same weeping redbud in bloom last spring




Just enough sun for the Hibiscus.


John Fanick's Phlox blooming around an old oak stump.  The Phlox was one of the first plants Melody planted in this garden about ten years ago.  The small lawn area is Floratam St. Augustine which uses less water than standard St. Augustine turf.



Succulents in a Karst stone.


Melody also brought home a Salvia 'Amistad' from our field trip to Vivero Growers.  Hers is doing beautifully by the back door, mine in more sun is struggling a bit lately in the hot afternoons.


Begonia for summer color against the light stucco house.


Melody has been adding more yucca and other low water plants.


I shared a couple of Opuntia Santa-rita pads a while back and now one is already producing a new pad.  I like the skewers used to keep them upright.



Two colors of Shrimp Plant looks so pretty with John Fanick's Phlox in the background.


Chile Pequin and Inland Sea Oats, both Texas native plants


Rhizomatous Begonia, I love the colors and texture on the stems.


Walking over to the barn and the new garden in the old corral.



An anole on the fence munching on something....


The last time I showed you this garden it was covered in plastic to solarize the bermuda grass and weeds.  Fall 2013


Over the past year Melody, along with gardener Jesse and his crew, have put down mulch in the pathways and added soil and compost to the boxes.

Back in March of this year planted with winter veggies.  It's looking good despite our tough winter. 


Now the area is transformed into a gorgeous, sunny garden.  



The boxes and planters have filled in with flowers, veggies and herbs this summer



Artichokes, I want to grow these just for the blooms!



Gomphrena and roses in a bed of cinder blocks.



Hibiscus and roses in one of the boxes



The wheelbarrow belonged to a long-time neighbor and Melody painted it to go with the other galvanized metal in the garden.



Near the wheelbarrow the bed of columbines and poppies bloomed prettily back in March.



Those decorative gourds left over from last fall seeded themselves here



Nearly ready for this fall


The window at the back of the barn.  The compost pile is back here.


This friendly lizard hangs out by the compost waiting for daily treats.  He is partial to grubs.


Around front the bright white accents of the caladiums pick up the colors of the house.  The wire is there to keep deer out of the border.



Last time I introduced to you to Lucy, a doe Melody hand feeds, and now this year Ethel has joined the mix of wildlife which call Melody's front yard home.


And the deer still gather awaiting the feeder each evening.


Melody's garden continues to provide inspiration for plants in my own garden and updating the blog is a great motivation for me to head over there with the camera so you're sure to see more of her garden in future posts.

28 comments:

  1. It's a lovely garden Shirley with so many ideas that can be 'borrowed' and nice touches like the caladiums, planted log and rocks, and other ornaments!

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    1. The caladiums are so pretty and work so well in our climate, I will look for some prettier varieties next year.

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  2. Lovely.
    I've planted croscosmia twice. I think a couple came up this time, but they're very small.
    Thanks for the tour.

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    1. They apparently take a while to establish so next time I'll give them more time.

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  3. You should definitely try Crocosmia again. I have a couple of different ones, and I love them.

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  4. What a pretty garden! I love the coral vine and the fact that Melody has found a middle ground to live with the surrounding wildlife.

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  5. It's so great to see an update on Melody's beautiful garden. She has so many unique decorative touches in addition to all her lovely plant combos.

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  6. Goodness, that's just so beautiful and there's so much variety. That coral vine! Mine's limping along this year--I wish it looked like hers. And the crocosmia--stunning! Your photos capture the breadth and scope of this lovely garden.

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    1. I am going to find a place for crocosmia in my garden. Just need to figure out the right spot. My coral vine is still young but is doing well.

      Planting more vines is one of the things I learned from Melody's garden the first time.

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  7. Great photos, these is much to enjoy here and you ended with a surprise, a gardener actually feeling (welcoming) the dear...crazy!

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    1. There is a high fence between the deer and the plants and the area where the deer gather is left mostly in its natural state because even deer-proof plants are at risk.

      We leave plenty of water out for all our wildlife visitors and the deer seem healthy since several neighbors do feed them. Some of our deer might be the same as Melody lives fairly close.

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  8. Thanks Shirley for the tour of my garden! It's amazing what happens when the true Texas heat sets in and sucks the moisture out of every living thing. Me included! My garden is limping along in August but seeing your photos makes me think that it will recover again. Now, if we'd only get some rain!!!

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    1. It will recover, it's just part of having a garden in Texas. We got rain last night so I'm sure you did too. It's not looking good for the next 10 days or so.

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  9. Shirley this is an amazing spot with so much to take in and inspire. Can't wait to see more!

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    1. Of course I'll try to revisit from time to time to share more.

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  10. Lucy & Ethel! I'll bet they are as entertaining as their namesakes. Loved revisiting Melody's garden with you and meeting its animal visitors too.

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    1. Those are cute names. They make the most comical faces.

      The animals are an important part of the mix.

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  11. What a beautiful garden! I added John Fanick phlox to my garden this summer and have high hopes for them. :o) The vine against the stucco is just stunning. Does the doe let Melody stroke her? What does she feed her?

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    1. John Fanick phlox is a reliable plant for many climates. It's fun to hear that it is available in so many places.

      I don't know about Ethel specifically but the deer will get tame quite quickly so it's possible. The deer are fed protein pellets with an occasional treat.

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  12. Your friend has a beautiful garden, Shirley! Nice job with the raised beds and all the beautiful planters!

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  13. A beautiful garden indeed and what a difference a year makes. She has sure been a busy gardener! It's interesting to see how plants that grow both here and there behave differently in each climate.

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  14. Hi Shirley. All these years of seeing those green lizards I never concerned myself with learning their name. Thanks for sharing your photo of that garden diner.

    Quick research revealed that they're the only native green lizard to North America, and are primarily found in the southeast. A particularly interesting note is that they've been used for "studying neurological disorders, and drug delivery systems and biochemical pathways related to human illnesses". As if I didn't like them enough already, thanks little guys.

    http://eol.org/pages/795869/overview

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  15. Oh, and lastly, female anoles "often have a line along the dorsal surface, and males commonly have a pinkish dewlap". Kinda neat to identify being able to identify garden friends.

    PS: Love the artichoke bloom. They have a great form already, but wow that bloom. Your photo has inspired me to plant a few. Thanks!

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    1. Hi Paul, I'm glad you are enjoying the blog and learning a few things too. The creatures visiting our gardens are fascinating. I try to share a few from my own garden for Wildlife Wednesday on the first Wednesday of each month.

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  16. Isn't it a wonderful and inspiring garden? Sun plants... shade plants.... food... wildlife... it's all there. I am particularly enamoured with lovely Salvia 'Amistad'.

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  17. Incredible, this garden really puts me at ease. Maybe it's partly your photo angles? The materials (rock walls, wood arbor, even sticks on the cactus pads) and the simple, orderly paths with the trees and planting beds, convey a relaxed neatness.

    I'll need to read your original post on her garden...

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  18. Lovely garden tour! I will try crocosmia once again! Very nice designer Melody is.

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  19. I loved the tour! Beautiful garden!! The stone with the succulents in it is adorable. You got some great shots- that first one in particular makes you want to pull up a chair and sit there a while. What beautiful combos- thanks for sharing!!!! Great capture on the anaole! On your Amistad- if it is in direct sun give it a little water on the hotter days and it will perk back up until it gets more established. So cute about the deer. Too fun.

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