Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Wildflower Wednesday March 2014: More of these please!

It's the fourth week of March and time for Wildflower Wednesday when I join Gail at Clay and Limestone and other bloggers to highlight flowering native plants in our gardens.  For March I'm featuring plants growing naturally around my area and native to South Texas that I'd like to see become established in my garden.

Last spring I discovered a small stand of Blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium angustifolium) along the creek behind the house.  Pretty and delicate with bright blue blooms in the spring, I was so pleased to find this native member of the iris family growing naturally just a foot or so over the property line.




Blue-eyed grass prefers a moist site which is not easily found in my yard.  This patch of Blue-eyed grass grows in a flood plain which is not likely to be built on in the short term so I will leave it alone to enjoy where it is each spring.


This one (which I had originally identified for this post as Arizona Poppy or Kallstroemia grandiflora) is Hudson Flax or Texas Flax (Linum hudsoniodes).


It's a pretty, low growing prairie plant which grows throughout Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma and is offered commercially according to the Native Plant Database.  This bloom is the only one I've seen in the area and was found in a location zoned for commercial development so I will have no problem collecting a few seeds from it if I can locate more this summer.

Facebook friend and reader Bonnie J. Bauer VanBerg helped me identify this native Anemone berlandieri which ranges in color from purple to white.  The flowers are on a 6" stem with the foliage close to the ground.


These cheery perennials pop up all around the yard in the spring so all I need to do to encourage more of them is let them go to seed.


The Pink Evening Primrose (Oenothera speciosa) was a childhood favorite and used to be a prolific spring bloomer all around my garden.  Lately it has retreated to the creek area along the edge of our property but I hope it will return to my garden soon as it's a pretty sign of spring.



Those are just a few of the local wildflowers I'd like to have more of as I mark one year of Wildflower Wednesday posts.  It's challenging and fun to seek out and identify these plants while sharing the process of establishing wildflowers in my yard.  Be sure to check out the other Wildflower Wednesday posts this month at Clay and Limestone.

27 comments:

  1. They are all delicate beauties Shirley and it's great to highlight local wildflowers that can be easily taken for granted.

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    1. I am appreciating them more and more as the weather takes out so many of the non-native plants in my garden.

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  2. What a great post! I'm not at all familiar with the poppy--it's a lovely little thing. I hope you're able to snag some seeds--it would be a nice addition to your gardens.

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    1. I'm keeping an eye on that spot so we'll see when it happens to pop up again this year.

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  3. I love blue eyed grass and it is having a particularly fabulous year. Yeah for wildflowers.

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    1. It is so special to just happen upon it. I found a few more stands of it this week and might just move some into the yard since there appears to be a lot of it around.

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  4. Have you tried saving seeds from the blue-eyed grass? I've grown it from seed, and it's pretty easy. Love this post, all so pretty and all different.

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    1. As I mentioned above we've located quite a few more and I might try transplanting. If not the seeds are a great idea too.

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  5. Despite the cold weather you've had, your blue-eyed grass and evening primrose have a head start on mine. The primrose is something of a weed here but it's too pretty to begrudge it some space every spring.

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    1. It's easy to see the primrose as a weed except I remember playing with them as a child so it's also a special memory. They do look pretty in groups in early spring too.

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  6. We just found some of the Anemone in our yard the other day. Somehow we missed it last year!

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    1. I hope you plan to keep it!

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  7. All of the sisyrinchiums seed around prolifically...to the point where I have been yanking them out by the handfuls. I never water them, so maybe you would have luck with them in your garden proper. I had a whole bank of the evening primrose that I loved, but it disappeared for no apparent reason. Seems funny that we share these in our disparate climates.

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    1. I can imagine they would look weedy when not in bloom which is why I enjoy them along the more natural edges of the garden. You get so much more rain which is probably why those two prefer the low spots along our creek to the drier yard.

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  8. Blue-Eyed Grass is nifty! I love to see it in the wild. Your photos are particularly lovely for Wildflower Wednesday, Shirley!

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    1. Thank you Beth, I enjoy Wildflower Wednesday each month.

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  9. Nice wildflowers. I hope some of them wander into your garden. Blue-eyed Grass is a favorite. I think my one plant died out last year. Can you remind me of the name of a plant you featured around 6 months ago. It is an annual yellow wildflower. I believe you received seeds from a friend in west Texas. The name may be Texas Star or something along those lines. I want to be on the look out for some since the native plant sales are coming up. Thanks. Oh I think I found it! Must have been Sleepy Daisy.

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    1. The plant is Sleepy Daisy and should be more common in North Texas than down here. It is available as bulk seed from several sources as well.

      The bright yellow would look good in your prairie garden.

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  10. Some of my fave wildflowers! ...and nice to learn about a Poppy I'd never heard of!

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    1. It's so pretty, I'll try to find more of them to show in the future.

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  11. I do love the BLue-eyed grasses and they divide wonderfully! I found it in my lawn (when I had one) back when our weather was more predictable and rain more regular...I enjoy the small but gorgeous flowering face and don't mind getting my knees dirty trying to capture a photo! Happy WW.

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    1. I very much enjoy tromping in the natural areas around the neighborhood seeking what's left of our native plants.

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  12. So many lovely wildflowers...I have some blue-eyed grass but yours in the wild is stunning. I think I really like the Anemone berlandieri the best.

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    1. The anemone was a chance find and I was happy to have it identified.

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  13. The Blue-eyed grass is so pretty! I have never heard of it before, in fact I have never seen any of the plants you are showing us, although I have heard about Evening Primrose – for PMS pain, I wonder if it is the same plant they use for the medicine? Thanks for sharing :-)

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    1. I looked it up and there are many uses for the oil extracted from the seeds which appear to be the same plant. It is very common all over the country.

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  14. I have this in my garden, too. I moved it to a new spot in a rocky section of my rain garden/dry riverbed and I hope it thrives. I really love the little blue flowers.

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